Quarantine extended for invasive spotted lanternfly in S.E. Pa.

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The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture has extended the area placed under quarantine for an invasion of spotted lanternfly to include nine additional municipalities in the southeastern part of the state.


“This is our third season of combating the spotted lanternfly, and despite extensive work that has helped slow the spread of this potentially devastating invasive pest, the addition of these new municipalities illustrates just how challenging a task that is,” said Agriculture Secretary Russell Redding.

The invasive bug, which is native to China, India, Japan, and Vietnam, was first detected in the United States in the fall of 2014 in Berks County. The insect is a significant threat to the more than $20.5 million grape industry, nearly $134 million apple industry, and more than $24 million stone fruit industry as well as the $12 billion in hardwood industry, the state reported.


Lateral view of an adult Spotted Lanternfly. Photo by Lawrence Barringer, Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture

Eighty-four municipalities in the southeaster part of the state are now affected. The quarantine restricts movement of any material or object that can spread the pest, including firewood or wood products, brush or yard waste, remodeling or construction materials and waste, grapevines for decorative purposes or as nursery stock, and any outdoor household articles such as lawnmowers, grills, tarps and other equipment, as well as trucks and vehicles not typically stored indoors, the state reported.

In Bucks County, there have been confirmed sightings of the insect in Springfield, East Rockhill and West Rockhill townships, as well as Perkasie, Sellersville and Telford Borough, which crosses into Montgomery County





In Berks County, Muhlenberg Township and Laureldale Borough were added to the quarantine area.

The insect is already present in parts of Chester, Northampton and Lehigh Counties.

“Our goal remains to eliminate this pest from Pennsylvania and see to it that it does not spread elsewhere. But to do that, we need the public to help us by watching out for these pests, reporting new infestations, and ensuring that they don’t hitch a ride when you travel,” Redding said.
























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