Local lawmakers slam Trump’s budget

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Mayor Kenney on Tuesday slammed President Trump’s budget, saying it would hurt low-income and middle-class Philadelphians with planned cuts to social services and Medicaid over the next decade.


“It makes achieving the American dream impossible for children born into poverty or the middle class,” he said in a statement. “This budget proposal is bad for Philadelphia and bad for our fellow Pennsylvanians. I urge everyone to call their representatives and ask them to oppose the Trump budget.”

Kenney echoed the concerns of local anti-poverty and healthcare advocates, saying cuts to programs like the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – which, under Trump’s proposal, would get $193 billion less over the next 10 years – would harm “Philadelphia’s most vulnerable children.” About 182,000 children here receive SNAP benefits, formerly known as food stamps. There are also 600,000 Philadelphians on the Medicaid rolls, Kenney said, which are also slated for changes in federal reimbursements that could fuel deep cuts over the next decade.


He also decried cuts to the Centers for Disease Control, which he said funds public health programs for childhood vaccination and cancer prevention in Philadelphia.

Other Democrats joined the chorus of protest for the plan. “The President talks about putting country first yet his budget does no such thing,” Rep. Dwight Evans (D., Pa.) said in a statement. Sen. Bob Casey (D., Pa.) called the proposal “an extreme document that reads like a wish list of special interest giveways and is riddled with broken promises,” and added that rural Pennsylvanians could lose out under the proposed elimination of an economic development program for the Appalachian region.

On the other side of the aisle, Sen. Pat Toomey (R,. Pa.)  said he supported “the broad goals” of the plan – tax reform, deregulation, trimming waste and balancing the budget.





But Toomey added there were “particulars with which I disagree.” He said he was concerned with nearly $6 billion in proposed cuts to the National Institutes of Health, which the administration is billing as a way to reduce the indirect costs of science research.

But Toomey stressed that Trump’s proposals are just that – proposals, echoing colleagues in Congress who have emphasized that the budget is theirs to hash out.

“It’s the beginning of a dialogue,” Rep. Patrick Meehan, (R., Pa.) told MSNBC on Monday.
























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1 Philadelphia

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